Next Recession Will Be Political, Not Economic

One of the economics blogs I like to check out is Project Syndicate, where University of California at Berkeley economist J. Bradford DeLong recently posted America’s Political Recession. Professor DeLong takes up the notion of a bipartisan solution for our economic woes and has an interesting take on the intransigence of the Republican Party:

Obama broadly follows Ronald Reagan’s (second-term) security policy, George H.W.  Bush’s spending policy, Bill Clinton’s tax policy, the bipartisan Squam Lake Group’s financial-regulatory policy, Perry’s  immigration policy, John McCain’s climate-change policy, and Mitt Romney’s  health-care policy (at least when Romney was governor of Massachusetts). And yet  he has gotten next to no Republicans to support their own policies.

Professor DeLong says the odds of our economy going into recession next year are about 36% — largely attributable to Republican intransigence. I hope he’s wrong, but take a look at his post.

About Maurice T. Cunningham

Maurice T. Cunningham is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts at Boston. He teaches courses in American government including Massachusetts Politics, The American Presidency, Catholics in Political Life, The Political Thought of Abraham Lincoln, American Political Thought, and Public Policy. His book Maximization, Whatever the Cost: Race, Redistricting and the Department of Justice examines the role of the DOJ in requiring states to maximize minority voting districts in the Nineties. He has published articles dealing with the role of the Catholic Church in Massachusetts politics and on party politics in the state. His research interests focus upon the changing political culture of Massachusetts. Professor Cunningham is a regular contributor to the online magazine CommonwealthMagazine.org. He is a former assistant district attorney and assistant attorney general in Massachusetts. Professor Cunningham is a lifelong resident of Massachusetts. He earned his BA at the University of Massachusetts at Boston, his JD at New England School of Law, and PhD at Boston College. He lives in Cambridge with his wife and two children.
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